Getting started with managing permissions for Microsoft and Google storage owners

In the institutional storage environments at IU, making sure your data is available to the people who need it and unavailable to those who don't is an important part of owning storage space. Microsoft SharePoint and Teams and Google Shared Drives have some unique considerations for managing permission. Join us for this webinar and learn about the different ways to manage permissions in both Microsoft Teams and Google Shared Drives.

Getting started with managing permissions for Microsoft and Google storage owners

Recorded 01-08-2021

Description of the video:

[music]Welcome to Getting started with managing permissions for Microsoft storage owners.In today’s session, you’ll learn more about how Microsoft Teams and SharePoint work together to grant users access to shared files,as well as how to assign those permissions to users of Microsoft storage.Before we go too far into exploring how to change and set permissions,let’s take a quick look at Microsoft Teams and learn how parts of a team are represented in SharePoint.A lot of what we’ll be doing today will involve working in both Teams and SharePoint,so it’s important to know how the two are connected.I’m using a demonstration account today – my alter ego for today will be Carol Cape.Carol owns a team in Microsoft Teams, O365-IU-UITS-ITT Permissions –I’ll start by using this team to show you how Teams and SharePoint are connected.When you create a team using the institutional storage request form on storage.iu.edu,you are creating two spaces within the Microsoft storage environment:a Microsoft Teams collaboration space and a SharePoint site for file storage.All of the file storage capabilities of a team are handled by SharePoint.When working in a team, you’ll have access to multiple channels, and each channel has its own file storage associated with it.Each team has a General channel by default – you can create channels to organize your team however you want.In the demo team I’m working with today, you can see we already have some folders here in the General channel.Each channel in Microsoft Teams is represented by a folder in the team’s SharePoint Documents library.When I visit my team’s storage on SharePoint, I see that there’s a folder for each channel in my team.If I open the General folder, I can see all the same files I have access to on the Files tab in the General channel.Now that we have a basic understanding of how Teams and SharePoint are connected,let’s take a closer look at how SharePoint and Microsoft Teams work together to grant access to users.First, let’s learn about the different types of permissions you can assign and how they work.When your department’s files are first migrated from Box,these shared items will appear in the account owner or manager’s Team in Microsoft Teamsand in the Shared section of OneDrive for individual users.At this point, the Team’s owner will need to decide how to progress with permissions:will permissions be set at the folder level, or at the Team level?Before we get into assigning permissions, let’s talk about how Microsoft’s storage is set up.When you create a new Team, a SharePoint site is also created – this is the team’s file storage space.Any files uploaded to a team are stored in SharePoint.The SharePoint site for a team has a number of user groups associated with it that provide access to the files stored there –when a user is added to a team, they’re also added to those groups, and have access to any files stored in that SharePoint site.However, that’s not the only way you can give a user access to files.You can also give someone permission to access individual folders through SharePoint, without giving them access to the whole team.If you give someone access to a folder through SharePoint, and then later add them to the team that contains that folder,they’ll have access to that folder in two ways: as part of the team whose storage contains that folder,and individually, through permissions assigned outside of the team.Because of how permissions are handled in Microsoft’s storage,it’s important to decide ahead of time how you’ll be setting permissions for each user that requires access to your files:at the folder level, or at the team level.What are the differences between folder-level permissions and Team-level permissions?If you choose to use folder-level permissions, a user can be given access to specific folders.This way, if a user has access to a number of folders in your group’s storage,you can remove their access to one folder and they’ll still retain access to the others.If you decide to assign team-level permissions, a user added to a team will have access to all the foldersincluded in that team’s SharePoint storage space.If a user is removed from the team, they lose access to all of the folders inside of that SharePoint site.The owner of the team will need to decide which way to go when it comes to assigning permissionsfor each user that requires access to the team’s files: folder-level or team-level.When making this decision, take into consideration that Microsoft as well as the IU Support Center recommend that,wherever possible, you manage permissions at the team level.Granting permissions at the team level is generally less complex and easier to maintainthan folder-level permission granted via SharePoint.Now, let’s talk about what you’ll need to do with your files post-migration.If your group’s files were migrated to Microsoft using SkySync,the folder-level permissions were migrated from Box to Microsoft’s storage.If you choose to work with team-level permissions, the best practice is to remove a user’s folder-level permissionsbefore granting them access to the team.Why should folder-level permissions from SharePoint be removed for a user before granting team-level permission?Let’s take a look at an example situation, where user3 has team-level accessas well as access to specific folders inside the team’s SharePoint site.If user3’s folder-level permissions are removed for a specific folder in SharePoint,they still have access to that folder because of their team-level access to the folder.If user3’s team-level permissions are removed,they still have access to any folders in the team’s SharePoint site that they were granted folder-level access to.Therefore, to streamline access management,the best practice is to remove folder-level permissions for any user you will invite to a team.This way, if someone is removed from a team, and they don’t have folder-level permission to anything within the team’s SharePoint site,they won’t still have access to folders inside of that team due to folder-level permissions.Now that we’ve got an idea of how Microsoft Teams and SharePoint work together to grant access to shared files,let’s continue with today’s session.The first thing we’ll learn how to do today is determining who has access to folders granted at the folder level.To do this, we’ll start out in Teams, then move to SharePoint.As a heads-up, I’ll be accessing Microsoft Teams through my web browser today –however, the web browser and desktop versions of Microsoft Teams are very similar,and everything I’m demonstrating today can be done in both versions of Teams.In Microsoft Teams, in the navigation on the left side of the window, click on Teams.The list of teams you’re a member of will display – from here, click on the name of the team you want to work with.For me, that’ll be O365-IU-UITS-ITT-Permissions. The General channel for that team will load.From here, in the navigation tabs at the top of the screen, click on the Files tab.The Files tab will load - in the toolbar near the top of the screen, click on Open in SharePoint.Your web browser will open a new tab, and show the folders and files for the General channel.Let’s see who has folder-level access to the General folder.To do this, we’ll need to move up to the parent folder of General, which is Documents.We can do this using the navigation breadcrumb trail, just underneath the toolbar near the top of the SharePoint interface –click on Documents to move up to the Documents folder.Now, let’s check the permissions for the General folder.Start by either right-clicking on the General folder, or hovering over the folder and clicking the three dots, or Show actions button.A menu will appear – in this menu, click on Manage access.The Manage Access panel will open on the right side of screen, showing who has access to the folder.We can see that there are a number of items in the list of who has direct access.First off, we have the user groups Microsoft Teams created in SharePoint when we first created the team.Those are managed through Microsoft Teams, so we won’t worry about those for now.I can also see individual users that also have access to this folder –Diane Dell, Cathy Catt, and Doris Daily all have folder-level permissions to access this folder.Now we know how to check specific folders to see who has folder-level access permissions –if we’re managing permissions for any of these users via Microsoft Teams,it might be wise to remove the folder-level permissions in SharePoint. Let’s learn how to do that now.We’ll pick up where we left off in the Manage Access panel.We can edit a user’s permissions from here, including removing someone’s folder-level access permissions.Let’s see how to do this by removing Diane Dell’s folder-level permissions.To see the individual permissions we can assign,click the drop-down arrow to the right of the user’s name – I’ll click the drop-down next to Diane Dell’s name.A menu will open, showing three options: Can edit, Can view, and Stop sharing.To remove Diane’s access, I’ll click on Stop Sharing.A dialog box will appear, asking if you want to remove Diane’s access – to continue, click the Remove button.Diane is removed from the list of users who have access to the folder.While we could repeat the process to remove permissions for each individual user,we also have the ability to adjust permissions for multiple users at once.Let’s explore how to do that.To adjust the permissions for multiple users, in the bottom right corner of the Manage Access panel, click the Advanced link.Depending on how long the list of users with direct access is, you may need to scroll down to see the link.A new browser tab will open, showing the access permissions for the folder.We can see everyone who has folder-level access, as well as the SharePoint groups that are used for assigning team-level permissions.Speaking of those SharePoint groups, you’ll want to make sure you don’t select those groupswhen adjusting permissions for multiple users, as that will affect the permissions for all the members of a team.Let’s see how to remove permissions from multiple users at the same timeby removing Cathy Catt and Doris Daily’s access permissions.We’ll start by selecting the users we want to work with – to select a user, click the checkbox to the left of their name.Once you’ve selected the users whose access you want to remove, in the Modify group on the ribbon, click Remove User Permissions.A dialog box will appear, displaying the text “Are you sure you want to remove all permissionsfor the selected users and groups to “General”?” To continue, click the OK button.I’ll actually click Cancel here, so I can demonstrate another way of removing permissions for multiple users.I’ll also quickly deselect Cathy and Doris.You might have noticed the yellow notification under the ribbon on my screen with the text “This folder has unique permissions.”This is referring to the fact that there are individual users with folder-level access outside of the groups granting permissions.If you want to remove all individual users from having access permissions for a specific folder,you can choose to remove all unique permissions,leaving only the groups used to give team-level permissions with access to the folder.To do this, in the Inheritance group on the ribbon, click Delete unique permissions.A dialog box will appear with the text “You are about to inherit permissions from the parent folder or document library.Any custom permissions will be lost.” To continue, click the OK button.The page will refresh, and all of the user accounts will be removed. Only the SharePoint group items are still listed.It’s important to remember that when you remove a user’s permissions from a top-level folder,it won’t remove any unique permissions given to that user on subfolders of that folder.If the subfolders have permissions added for individuals,you’ll want to navigate through the folder structureto remove permissions on any folders that had unique permissions assigned when they were migrated from Box.Removing users from direct-folder access on a top-level folder will only remove permissions for subfolderswhere those folders are inheriting their permissions from the parent folder.For example, Abby Abernathy was given folder-level access to the Projects folder, not the parent folder of General.When everyone’s permissions were removed from the General folder,they were also removed from any subfolders they had the same level of access to that were located inside General.However, since Abby had been given unique permissions to the Projects subfolder,she was not removed from having access to that folder.If you had set permissions in Box where people only had access to specific folders,you should consider removing permissions from each folder with unique permissions if you’re moving to team-level permissions.Let’s shift gears now and talk about how to add team-level permissions for users.After removing folder-level permissions,you’ll want to add those users to the team you’ve created, so they can access the files and folders they need.You can add people to a team through the Microsoft Teams app.In Microsoft Teams, in the navigation on the left side of the window, click Teams.A list of the teams you’re a member of will display.Look for the team you want to add members to in the list of teams, and click the Show Actions, or three-dots button.If you’re viewing the team list in grid view, this button will be in the upper right corner of the team’s tile –in list view, it’ll be to the right of the team’s name.A menu will appear. You can also access this menu by right-clicking on the team’s name.To continue, click on Manage Team.You’ll be shown a list of the current members of the team.To start adding new members, near the upper right corner of the screen, click the Add member button.A dialog box will appear, with the title Add members to and your team’s name.If you’re doing this on your own, your team’s name will appear where O365-IU-UITS-ITT Permissions shows up for me.To add someone to the team, in the text entry field, start typing their username or their name.I’m going to add Diane Dell to the team – her username is demo33.As I'm typing, underneath this field, a list of suggestions will pop up –Teams is connected to the IU global address list, which is where these suggestions come from.Diane shows up at the top of the list, so I’ll click on her name to select it, and then click the Add button to the right of the text entry field.I’ll repeat the process for the additional people I want to add –I’ll add Cathy Catt and Doris Daily to the team, and they’ll appear in the list of newly added members underneath the text entry field.Before we continue, let’s take a closer look at that list.We see two permission levels here: owner and member. By default, people are added as members of a team.The two permission levels grant users different abilities.Owners can manage a team’s content, members, and settings.You should limit the amount of people in a team owner role –typically, a department or group manager should have owner permissions,as well as the Team’s owner, if the owner is different from the department manager.Members of a team can add, edit, move, and delete files.A team’s owner can also grant additional permissions to members if desired.For more information about permissions in Teams,view the Assign team owners and members in Microsoft Teams document in the Microsoft Teams documentation.We’ll leave Cathy, Doris, and Diane in the Member role –to finish adding them to the team, at the bottom right corner of the dialog box, click the Close button.Now, if we expand the Members and Guests section by clicking on the section heading,we’ll see the new team members we just added – Doris, Diane, and Cathy.If you’ve decided to use team-level permissions for accessing files in Microsoft storage,you won’t need to assign folder-level permissions to the people you’ve added to the team.However, there may be instances where you need to give a person access to a single folder.For example, you might hire a student intern that’s working on a very specific project,and as such, they only need access to the project folder, and not the entire team.This is where folder-level permissions can come in handy.Let’s see how to give someone access to a specific folder -we’ll give Abby Abernathy access to a specific folder inside the Projects folder. We’ll need to do this in SharePoint.There are a few different ways to access SharePoint – the quickest way is by going through Microsoft Teams.We'll start by navigating to the team you want to work with – in my case, I’ll go to O365-IU-UITS-ITT Permissions.The team’s General channel will load. From here, in the navigation tabs at the top of the screen, click on Files,then in the toolbar across the top of the screen, click Open in SharePoint.A new browser tab will open, and SharePoint will load and display the General folder’s contents.I want to give Abby access to a folder inside the Active Projects folder, which is inside Projects.I’ll navigate there by clicking on Projects, then Active Projects.The Excel Macros folder is the one I want to give Abby access to.To start the process, I’ll right-click on the Excel Macros folder.A menu will appear. We can also access this menu by clicking on the vertical three dots, or Show Actions, button.In the menu, click on Manage Access. The Manage Access panel will open –we saw this panel earlier, when removing folder-level permissions.Next, to the right of the Direct Access heading in the Manage Access panel, click on the Grant Access button – it looks like a blue plus sign.A pop-up will appear, with the text Grant Access at the top.In the Enter a name or email address field, type the username of the person you want to give permissions to.In my case, that’ll be demo31, for Abby Abernathy.Just like earlier when adding a new member to a team, a list of suggestions will pop up under the text field as I type,suggesting usernames from the IU global address book.Click on the username you want to add – I’ll click on Abby.Repeat the process for whoever else you want to give access to – keep in mind, however, that if you add multiple accounts at once,all the accounts will be assigned the same permission level.There are two permission levels we can grant to users here: Can Edit and Can View.If we want users to be able to edit the contents of the folder, you’ll want to assign the Can Edit permission.If you only want the users you’re adding to be able to view the file, you can assign them the Can View permission.If desired, you can also add a message to the users, or simply notify them that they’ve been given access to a folder.If you don’t want users to be notified, uncheck the box next to Notify People.To finish granting access to the folder, click the Grant Access button at the bottom of the pop-upand the users will be granted access to the folder based on the permissions you’ve assigned.The Manage Access panel doesn’t always update immediately to reflect the changes you’ve made.In order to see the changes, you’ll want to close the Manage Access panel by clicking the close buttonin the upper right corner of the panel, then reopening the panel by right-clicking on the folder we were just working withand selecting Manage access from the menu that appears.The accounts you’ve added should now appear in the Manage Access panel.Accounts with edit permissions will have a pencil icon to the right of their username,and accounts with view permissions will have a crossed-out pencil icon to the right of their username.Once you’ve assigned permissions to a user at the folder level, you can make adjustments to those permissions as needed.To do this, you’ll need to be in SharePoint, like we are now.We’ll start by opening the Manage Access panel for the folder that we want to adjust a user’s access to.As a reminder, we can do this by right-clicking the folder’s name, and in the menu that appears, clicking on Manage Access.In the Manage Access panel, to adjust the permissions for a specific user,click the drop-down arrow to the right of their name, then click the permission level you want to assign to them.Changes will be automatically saved as you make them.
Recorded 02-26-2021

Description of the video:

[music]Welcome to Getting Started with Managing Permissions for Google Storage Owners.In today’s session, you’ll learn more about how to work with permissions on Google Shared Drives.First, let’s learn about the different types of permissions you can assign and how they work.When your department’s files are first migrated from Box, these shared items will appear in the account owneror manager’s Shared Drive and in the Shared With Me section of an individual user’s My Drive.At this point, the Shared Drive’s owner will need to decide how to grant permission to each user:will a user require access to individual folders or do they need access to the entire contents of the Shared Drive?Before deciding what kind of access each user needs, let’s take a look at the implications of both.If you choose to grant permission at the folder level, the user can be given access to specific folders.This way, if the user has access to several folders in your group’s Shared Drive,you can remove their access to one folder and they’ll still retain access to the others.If you decide to grant permission at the drive level, the user will have access to all the folders included in that Shared Drive.If the user is removed from the Shared Drive, their access is revoked from all folders in the drive.The owner of the Shared Drive will need to decide which way to gowhen it comes to assigning permissions for each user who requires access to the team’s files.When making this decision, take into consideration that Google as well as the IU Support Center recommend that,whenever possible, you manage permissions at the drive level.Granting permissions at the drive level is generally less complex and easier to maintain than folder-level permissions.When your files were migrated to Google Shared Drives from Box,the top-level folder permissions were not migrated along with the folders and files.However, for lower-level folders, the permissions were migrated from Box.Now that we understand the two ways we can grant permission to users in Google Shared Drives, let’s learn how to manage user access.Let’s look at the environment we’ll be working with in today’s session.I’ll be using a demonstration account – Diane Dell is my alter ego for today’s session.Diane is the owner of a Google Shared Drive, called IU-UITS-Google Permissions.This training Shared Drive is set up to mimic what shared drive managers will see when shared content is migrated from Box.Let’s see how to access the drive, and look at its contents.To start, in the navigation on the left side of the screen, click Shared Drives.A list of the shared drives that Diane has access to will display – to access a shared drive, double-click its name to open it.In my case, I’ll double-click on the IU-UITS-Google Permissions drive.We see the contents of the Google Permissions drive. This drive contains 5 top-level folders,which aren’t currently being shared.However, many of these folders have subfolders where a user was either added to the subfolder (but not the parent folder) in Box,or their access level was increased at a lower folder level (for example, they had View permission for the top-level folder,but Editor permission for a subfolder).As the Shared Drive manager, Diane can make the decision if she wants to use folder-level permissionsor drive-level permissions on an individual user basis.If she decides to use folder-level permissions, she’ll need to add the user to the top-level folders so they can access the files they need.However, assigning drive-level permissions is the recommended best practice.To follow this recommendation, Diane will need to add the user to the Shared Driveand take time to check their access to lower-level folders. Let’s see how to do this.Diane has a number of other users who need access to the Google Permissions shared drive.We’ll start by seeing who currently has access.To view the members of the Google Permissions shared drive, under the search bar near the top of the screen,right-click on the shared drive’s name, and in the menu that appears, click on Manage Members.The Manage members dialog box will appear and display a list of people who are currently a member of this shared drive.At this point, the Shared Drive has two members: Diane and my personal account.In this dialog box, I can grant access to individual users either by their email address (for non-IU collaborators) or their IU Username.I will begin by adding Carol Cape, whose username is demo32.To start adding a user to a shared drive, near the top of the Manage members dialog box, click in the Add people and groups field.When you click in the Add people and groups field, Google will display a list of users you frequently share with underneath the text field.If the user you want to add doesn’t show up in this list, start typing their name or username in the Add people and groups field.I’ll type demo32 here, which is the first part of Carol’s email address.As you type, the drop-down underneath the text field will display users from the IU address book –once you see the name of the user you want to add, click on their name to select them.The Manage members dialog box contents change.From here, I can choose what permissions to grant Carol to the contents of the shared drive, as well as send her a message if desired.We could also add additional users to the list of people we want to add to the shared drive –however, if we add multiple users at the same time, they’ll all have the same access level assigned to them.If we need to assign different levels of access to different users, we’ll want to add them separately.Let’s quickly look at the different access levels we can grant users.To view the full list of access levels, near the top right corner of the Manage members dialog box,click on the Content Manager drop-down menu.Content Manager is the default access level assigned when adding new users to a Shared Drive.This level of access will let Carol add, edit, move, and delete files.We also see the other access levels we could assign to Carol – Viewer, Commenter, Contributor, and Manager.Let’s quickly talk about the manager permission.In Google, the manager permission is equivalent to a drive owner.Managers can add and delete content as well as change settings and add or remove users from the drive.It’s best to only assign this role to one or two people at the most.I’ll assign Carol Contributor access by clicking on Contributor in the access drop-down menu.Carol will be able to create and work with files on the Shared Drive as she needs to, but she will not be able to delete files.The access levels used for your specific Shared Drive will depend on your team’s needs and the work being done.For example, you may decide that group leaders should have Content Manager access and the ability to delete files,while student interns should only have Commenter access.Now that I’ve chosen a access level for Carol, I can notify Carol about this change,and even write her a note to give her information about what’s going on.To choose to not notify a user that they’ve been added to a Shared Drive, above the Message field, uncheck the box next to Notify people.I’ll leave this checked for today, because I want to notify Carol that she’s been added to the Shared Drive.To add a personal message to the notification, in the Message field, type out a message.I’ll type “You now have Contributor access to our shared drive.”To finish adding a user to the shared drive, in the bottom right corner of the Manage Members dialog box, click the Send button.I’m going to add a second user to the team – Abby Abernathy will be added as a content manager of the Shared Drive.I’ll need to reopen the Manage members dialog box first –again, we can do this by right-clicking on the team’s name near the top of the screenand clicking on Manage Members in the menu that appears.Just like we did previously, I’ll type Abby’s username, demo31, into the Add people and groups field,and click her name when it shows up underneath the text entry field.I’ll leave her access level as Content manager, uncheck the Notify checkbox, and click the Send button to finish adding Abby.To see the new permissions in the Details pane, refresh the page –the users you added should now show up under the Who has access heading.Abby and Carol now have access to the IU-UITS-Google Permissions Shared Drive –they each have different access levels set, but they both can access all the contents of the Shared Drive.Now that the team members have been added to the Shared drive,Diane will need to look through the folders and confirm that the lower-level permissions are accurate.Let’s take a moment to examine the permissions related to top-level and lower-level folders.If I click on the folder called Parent folder and then look at the details panel, I can see that Diane, Carol, and Abbyhave access to this folder. However, when I open the folder, I can see that it contains a folder called Child folder.This folder has been shared with Doris as well as the members of the Shared Drive.At some point in the past, Doris was added to this lower-level folder.This folder permission remained after the migration.If Doris still needs access to the contents of this drive, we can leave this as it is.However, it’s also possible that Doris has left her position or is no longer working on this project.If that is the case, we can remove her from this lower-level folder.To start the process of removing a user from a folder, right-click on the folder, and in the menu that appears, click on Share.The Share dialog box will open and display a list of all the users who have access to the folder.To see users who have access to the folder who aren’t part of the team, under the Add people and groups field, click the Guests tab.Since Doris Daily isn’t a member of the Shared Drive, she shows up on the Guests tab.To remove Doris’s access to the folder, to the right of Doris’s name, click on the Content manager drop-down,and in the menu that appears, click on Remove. Doris no longer has access to this folder.If you want users from outside IU or your group to be able to access folders in this Shared Drive,we can do this – however, we may need to adjust some drive-level settings first.Before we go into adjusting settings for sharing, it’s important to be aware of some limitations for sharing files and folders,based on a user’s access level.For sharing files, a user needs to have at least Contributor access to the file they want to share.Sharing folders requires the user to have Manager access to the folders they want to share.Now, let’s go ahead with changing the sharing settings for the drive.To see the settings for the drive, at the top of the screen under the search bar,right click on the drive’s name, and in the menu that appears, click on Shared Drive Settings.In this dialog box, the Shared Drive’s manager can choose to allow files to be shared outside of IUor with users who are not members of the Shared Drive.There is also the option to let users download, copy, and print files.Depending on the type of work being done and the type of data being shared,there may be restrictions on what can be shared and with whom.I don’t need to change any of these settings for today – to close the dialog box without making changes,in the lower right corner of the Shared drive settings dialog box, click the Done button.We’ve seen how to add users to a shared drive and adjust drive-level access,as well as how to remove a user from a child folder that may have inherited its permissions from Box.Now, let’s see how to assign folder-level access in Google Shared Drives.Let’s say that Diane has a student intern that needs access to a folder.This intern does not need access to the entire Shared Drive - and in fact, shouldn’t have access to all the content of the Shared Drive.However, they need access to the folder that contains their assigned project.I can add this student to just one folder.We’ll see how to grant a user access to a folder by adding Cathy Catt to a folder inside the Current Projects folder.To start, I’ll double-click on the Current Projects folder.I now see a folder called Intern Projects – this is the folder I want Cathy Catt to be able to access.I’ll right click on the folder, and in the menu that appears, I’ll click on Share.The Share with people and groups dialog box will appear, like we’ve seen before.To add a user to the folder, type in their name or username in the Add people and groups field.For me, I’ll type in demo34, and click on Cathy’s name in the list that appears under the text entry field.I’ll change the access level for Cathy Catt to Contributor, and when I’m done, I’ll click the Send button.Cathy now has access to the Intern Projects folder – and if we go up a level and check the list of peoplewho have access to Current Projects, Cathy doesn’t appear on this list – she only has access to the Intern Projects folder.What if we have a user that we only want to be able to access a single file?We can do that as well – the process is the same as it is for granting access to a single folder.Diane has another intern, Luke, who isn’t involved in the same project as Cathy –however, Diane wants him to have access to a single file in the Intern Projects folder, the Intern Document Google Doc.Let’s see how to grant access to a single file.First, I’ll navigate to the Intern Projects folder.Once I’m, in the folder, I’ll right click on the file Intern Document, and in the menu that appears,I’ll click Share – the Share with people and groups dialog box appears.Just like we’ve done previously, I’ll type Luke’s username, demo30, in the Add people and groups field,and click his name when it appears in the list.I’ll leave his access level at Editor and click the Send button in the lower right corner of the dialog box to finish adding Luke to the file.When I refresh my browser, I can see that Luke now has access to the Google doc.I’ll move up a level to see the Intern Projects folder – we can see that Luke does not have access to this folder.

Managing permissions for Microsoft storage owners

Welcome to Getting started with managing permissions for Microsoft storage owners. In today’s session, you’ll learn more about how Microsoft Teams and SharePoint work together to grant users access to shared files, as well as how to assign those permissions to users of Microsoft storage.

Understanding how Microsoft Teams and SharePoint work together

Before we go too far into exploring how to change and set permissions, let’s take a quick look at Microsoft Teams and learn how parts of a team are represented in SharePoint. A lot of what we’ll be doing today will involve working in both Teams and SharePoint, so it’s important to know how the two are connected.

I’m using a demonstration account today – my alter ego for today will be Carol Cape. Carol owns a team in Microsoft Teams, O365-IU-UITS-ITT Permissions – I’ll start by using this team to show you how Teams and SharePoint are connected.

  • When you create a team using the institutional storage request form on storage.iu.edu, you are creating two spaces within the Microsoft storage environment: a Microsoft Teams collaboration space and a SharePoint site for file storage.
  • All of the file storage capabilities of a team are handled by SharePoint.
  • When working in a team, you’ll have access to multiple channels, and each channel has its own file storage associated with it. Each team has a General channel by default – you can create channels to organize your team however you want. In the demo team I’m working with today, you can see we already have some folders here in the General channel.
  • Each channel in Microsoft Teams is represented by a folder in the team’s SharePoint Documents library. When I visit my team’s storage on SharePoint, I see that there’s a folder for each channel in my team. If I open the General folder, I can see all the same files I have access to on the Files tab in the General channel.
  • Now that we have a basic understanding of how Teams and SharePoint are connected, let’s take a closer look at how SharePoint and Microsoft Teams work together to grant access to users.

Introducing permissions

  • First, let’s learn about the different types of permissions you can assign and how they work.
  • When your department’s files are first migrated from Box, these shared items will appear in the account owner or manager’s Team in Microsoft Teams and in the Shared section of OneDrive for individual users.
  • At this point, the Team’s owner will need to decide how to progress with permissions: will permissions be set at the folder level, or at the Team level?
  • Before we get into assigning permissions, let’s talk about how Microsoft’s storage is set up.
  • Because of how permissions are handled in Microsoft’s storage, it’s important to decide ahead of time how you’ll be setting permissions for each user that requires access to your files: at the folder level, or at the team level.
  • What are the differences between folder-level permissions and Team-level permissions? Let’s take a deeper look at the two types of permissions.
  • If you choose to use folder-level permissions, a user can be given access to specific folders. This way, if a user has access to a number of folders in your group’s storage, you can remove their access to one folder and they’ll still retain access to the others.
  • If you decide to assign team-level permissions, a user added to a team will have access to all the folders included in that team’s SharePoint storage space. If a user is removed from the team, they lose access to all of the folders inside of that SharePoint site.
  • The owner of the team will need to decide which way to go when it comes to assigning permissions for each user that requires access to the team’s files: folder-level or team-level.
  • When making this decision, take into consideration that Microsoft as well as the IU Support Center recommend that, wherever possible, you manage permissions at the team level. Granting permissions at the team level is generally less complex and easier to maintain than folder-level permission granted via SharePoint.
  • Now, let’s talk about what you’ll need to do with your files post-migration.
  • If your group’s files were migrated to Microsoft using SkySync, the folder-level permissions were migrated from Box to Microsoft’s storage. If you choose to work with team-level permissions, the best practice is to remove a user’s folder-level permissions before granting them access to the team.
  • Why should folder-level permissions from SharePoint be removed for a user before granting team-level permission? Let’s take a look at an example situation, where user3 has team-level access as well as access to specific folders inside the team’s SharePoint site.
  • If user3’s folder-level permissions are removed for a specific folder in SharePoint, they still have access to that folder because of their team-level access to the folder.
  • If user3’s team-level permissions are removed, they still have access to any folders in the team’s SharePoint site that they were granted folder-level access to.
  • Therefore, to streamline access management, the best practice is to remove folder-level permissions for any user you will invite to a team. – this way, if someone is removed from a team, and they don’t have folder-level permission to anything within the team’s SharePoint site, they won’t still have access to folders inside of that team due to folder-level permissions.
  • Now that we’ve got an idea of how Microsoft Teams and SharePoint work together to grant access to shared files, let’s continue with today’s session.

Determining who has folder-level permissions on individual folders

The first thing we’ll learn how to do today is determining who has access to folders granted at the folder level. To do this, we’ll start out in Teams, then move to SharePoint.

As a heads-up, I’ll be accessing Microsoft Teams through my web browser today – however, the web and desktop versions of Microsoft Teams are very similar, and everything I’m demonstrating today can be done in both versions of Teams.

  • In Microsoft Teams, in the navigation on the left side of the window, click on Teams. The list of teams you’re a member of will display – from here, click on the name of the team you want to work with. For me, that’ll be O365-IU-UITS-ITT-Permissions. The General channel for that team will load.
  • From here, in the navigation tabs at the top of the screen, click on the Files
  • The Files tab will load - in the toolbar near the top of the screen, click on Open in SharePoint. Your web browser will open, and show the folders and files for the General channel.
  • Let’s see who has folder-level access to the General folder. To do this, we’ll need to move up to the parent folder of General, Documents. We can do this using the navigation breadcrumb trail, just underneath the toolbar near the top of the SharePoint interface – click on Documents to move up to the Documents folder.
  • Now, let’s check the permissions for the General folder. Start by either right-clicking on the General folder, or hovering over the folder and clicking the three dots, or Show actions A menu will appear – in this menu, click on Manage access.
  • The Manage Access panel will open on the right side of screen, showing who has access to the folder. We can see that there are a number of items in the list of who has direct access.
    • First off, we have the user groups Microsoft Teams created in SharePoint when we first created the team. Those are managed through Microsoft Teams, so we won’t worry about those for now.
    • I can also see individual users that also have access to this folder – Diane Dell, Cathy Catt, and Doris Daily all have folder-level permissions to access this folder.
  • Now we know how to check specific folders to see who has folder-level access permissions – if we’re managing permissions for any of these users via Microsoft Teams, it might be wise to remove the folder-level permissions in SharePoint. Let’s learn how to do that now.

Removing folder-level permissions

We’ll pick up where we left off in the Manage Access panel. We can edit a user’s permissions from here, including removing someone’s folder-level access permissions. Let’s see how to do this by removing Diane Dell’s folder-level permissions.

  • To see the individual permissions we can assign, click the drop-down arrow to the right of the user’s name – I’ll click the drop-down next to Diane Dell’s name. A menu will open, showing three options: Can Edit, Can View, and Stop Sharing.
  • To remove Diane’s access, I’ll click on Stop Sharing. A dialog box will appear, asking if you want to remove Diane’s access – to continue, click the Remove
  • Diane is removed from the list of users who have access to the folder.
  • While we could repeat the process to remove permissions for each individual user, we also have the ability to adjust permissions for multiple users at once. Let’s explore how to do that.
  • To adjust the permissions for multiple users, in the bottom right corner of the Manage Access panel, click the Advanced (Depending on how long the list of users with direct access is, you may need to scroll down to see the link.)
    • A new browser tab will open, showing the access permissions for the folder. We can see everyone who has folder-level access, as well as the SharePoint groups that are used for assigning team-level permissions.
    • Speaking of those SharePoint groups, you’ll want to make sure you don’t select those groups when adjusting permissions for multiple users, as that will affect the permissions for all the members of a team.
    • Let’s see how to remove permissions from multiple users at the same time by removing Cathy Catt and Doris Daily’s access permissions.
    • We’ll start by selecting the users we want to work with – to select a user, click the checkbox to the left of their name.
    • Once you’ve selected the users whose access you want to remove, in the Modify group on the ribbon, click Remove User Permissions.
    • A dialog box will appear, displaying the text “Are you sure you want to remove all permissions for the selected users and groups to “General”?” To continue, click the OK
    • I’ll actually click Cancel here, so I can demonstrate another way of removing permissions for multiple users. I’ll also quickly deselect Cathy and Doris.
  • You might have noticed the yellow notification under the ribbon on my screen with the text “This folder has unique permissions.” This is referring to the fact that there are individual users with folder-level access outside of the groups granting permissions.
  • If you want to remove all individual users from having access permissions for a specific folder, you can choose to remove all unique permissions, leaving only the groups used to give team-level permissions with access to the folder.
    • To do this, in the Inheritance group on the ribbon, click Delete unique permissions.
    • A dialog box will appear with the text “You are about to inherit permissions from the parent folder or document library. Any custom permissions will be lost.” To continue, click the OK
    • The page will refresh, and all of the user accounts will be removed. Only the SharePoint group items are still listed.
  • It’s important to remember that when you remove a user’s permissions from a top-level folder, it won’t remove any unique permissions given to that user on subfolders of that folder. If the subfolders have permissions added for individuals, you’ll want to navigate through the folder structure to remove permissions on any folders that had unique permissions assigned when they were migrated from Box. Removing users from direct-folder access on a top-level folder will only remove permissions for subfolders where those folders are inheriting their permissions from the parent folder.
  • For example, Abby Abernathy (whose account is demo31) was given folder-level access to the Projects folder, not the parent folder of General. When everyone’s permissions were removed from the General folder, they were also removed from any subfolders they had the same level of access to that were located inside General.
  • However, since Abby had been given unique permissions to the Projects subfolder, she was not removed from having access to that folder. If you had set permissions in Box where people only had access to specific folders, you should consider removing permissions from each folder with unique permissions if you’re moving to team-level permissions.

Adding team-level permissions

Let’s shift gears now and talk about how to add team-level permissions for users.

After removing folder-level permissions, you’ll want to add those users to the team you’ve created, so they can access the files and folders they need. You can add people to a team through the Microsoft Teams app.

  • In Microsoft Teams, in the navigation on the left side of the window, click Teams. A list of the teams you’re a member of will display.
  • Look for the team you want to add members to in the list of teams, and click the Show Actions (three-dots) button. If you’re viewing the team list in grid view, this button will be in the upper right corner of the team’s tile – in list view, it’ll be to the right of the team’s name. A menu will appear – to continue, click on Manage Team. (You can also access this menu by right-clicking on the team’s name.)
  • You’ll be shown a list of the current members of the team. To start adding new members, near the upper right corner of the screen, click the Add member
  • A dialog box will appear, with the title Add members to and your team’s name. If you’re doing this on your own, your team’s name will appear where O365-IU-UITS-ITT Permissions shows up for me. To add someone to the team, in the text entry field, start typing their username or their name. I’m going to add Diane Dell to the team – her username is demo33.
  • Under the field, a list of suggestions will pop up – Teams is connected to the IU global address list, which is where these suggestions come from. Diane shows up at the top of the list, so I’ll click on her name to select it, and then click the Add button to the right of the text entry field.
  • I’ll repeat the process for the additional people I want to add – I’ll add Cathy Catt and Doris Daily to the team, and they’ll appear in the list of newly added members underneath the text entry field.
  • Before we continue, let’s take a closer look at that list. We see two permission levels here: owner and member. By default, people are added as members of a team.
  • The two permission levels grant users different abilities.
    • Owners can manage a team’s content, members, and settings. You should limit the amount of people in a team owner role – typically, a department or group manager should have owner permissions, as well as the Team’s owner, if the owner is different from the department manager.
    • Members of a team can add, edit, move, and delete files. A team’s owner can also grant additional permissions to members if desired. For more information about permissions in Teams, view the Assign team owners and members in Microsoft Teams document in the Microsoft Teams documentation. (https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoftteams/assign-roles-permissions)
  • We’ll leave Cathy, Doris, and Diane in the Member role – to finish adding them to the team, at the bottom right corner of the dialog box, click the Close
  • Now, if we expand the Members and Guests section by clicking on the section heading, we’ll see the new team members we just added – Doris, Diane, and Cathy.

Assigning folder-level permissions

If you’ve decided to use team-level permissions for accessing files in Microsoft storage, you won’t need to assign folder-level permissions to the people you’ve added to the team. However, there may be instances where you need to give a person access to a single folder – for example, you might hire a student intern that’s working on a very specific project, and as such, they only need access to the project folder, and not the entire team. This is where folder-level permissions can come in handy.

Let’s see how to give someone access to a specific folder - we’ll give Abby Abernathy access to a specific folder inside the Projects folder. We’ll need to do this in SharePoint.

  • There are a few different ways we can get to SharePoint – the quickest way is by going through Microsoft Teams.
  • Start by navigating to the team you want to work with – in my case, I’ll go to O365-IU-UITS-ITT Permissions.
  • The team’s General channel will load. From here, in the navigation tabs at the top of the screen, click on Files, then in the toolbar across the top of the screen, click Open in SharePoint.
  • A new browser tab will open, and SharePoint will load and display the General folder’s contents. I want to give Abby access to a folder inside the Active Projects folder, which is inside Projects. I’ll navigate there by clicking on Projects, then Active Projects.
  • The Excel Macros folder is the one I want to give Abby access to. To start the process, I’ll right-click on the Excel Macros folder. A menu will appear. (We can also access this menu by clicking on the three vertical dots, or Show Actions, button.)
  • In the menu, click on Manage Access. The Manage Access panel will open – we saw this panel earlier, when removing folder-level permissions.
  • Next, to the right of the Direct Access heading in the Manage Access panel, click on the Grant Access button – it looks like a blue plus sign.
  • A pop-up will appear, with the text Grant Access at the top. In the Enter a name or email address field, type the username of the person you want to give permissions to. In my case, that’ll be demo31, for Abby Abernathy.
  • Just like earlier when adding a new member to a team, a list of suggestions will pop up under the text field as I type, suggesting usernames from the IU global address book. Click on the username you want to add – I’ll click on Abby.
  • Repeat the process for whoever else you want to give access to – keep in mind, however, that if you add multiple accounts at once, all the accounts will be assigned the same permission level.
  • There are two permission levels we can grant to users here: Can Edit and Can View. If we want users to be able to edit the contents of the folder, you’ll want to assign the Can Edit permission. If you only want the users you’re adding to be able to view the file, you can assign them the Can View permission.
  • If desired, you can also add a message to the users, or simply notify them that they’ve been given access to a folder. If you don’t want users to be notified, uncheck the box next to Notify People.
  • To finish granting access to the folder, click the Grant Access button at the bottom of the pop-up and the users will be granted access to the folder based on the permissions you’ve assigned.
  • The Manage Access panel doesn’t always update immediately to reflect the changes you’ve made – in order to see the changes, you’ll want to close the Manage Access panel by clicking the close button in the upper right corner of the panel, then reopening the panel by right-clicking on the folder we were just working with and selecting Manage access from the menu that appear.
  • The accounts you’ve added should now appear in the Manage Access panel. Accounts with edit permissions will have a pencil icon to the right of their username, and accounts with view permissions will have a crossed-out pencil icon next to their username.

Managing folder-level permissions

Once you’ve assigned permissions to a user at the folder level, you can make adjustments to those permissions as needed. To do this, you’ll need to be in SharePoint, like we are now.

  • We’ll start by opening the Manage Access panel for the folder that we want to adjust a user’s access to. As a reminder, we can do this by right-clicking the folder’s name, and in the menu that appears, clicking on Manage Access.
  • In the Manage Access panel, to adjust the permissions for a specific user, click the drop-down arrow to the right of their name, then click the permission level you want to assign to them. Changes will be automatically saved as you make them.

Managing permissions for Google storage owners

Welcome to Getting Started with Managing Permissions for Google Storage Owners. In today’s session, you’ll learn more about how to work with permissions on Google Shared Drives.

Introduction to permissions

  • First, let’s learn about the different types of permissions you can assign and how they work.
  • When your department’s files are first migrated from Box, these shared items will appear in the account owner or manager’s Shared Drive and in the Shared With Me section of an individual user’s My Drive.
  • At this point, the Shared Drive’s owner will need to decide how to grant permission to each user: will a user require access to individual folders or do they need access to the entire contents of the Shared Drive?
  • Before deciding what kind of access each user needs, let’s take a look at the implications of both.
  • If you choose to grant permission at the folder level, the user can be given access to specific folders. This way, if the user has access to several folders in your group’s Shared Drive, you can remove their access to one folder and they’ll still retain access to the others.
  • If you decide to grant permission at the drive level, the user will have access to all the folders included in that Shared Drive. If the user is removed from the Shared Drive, their access is revoked from all folders in the drive.
  • The owner of the Shared Drive will need to decide which way to go when it comes to assigning permissions for each user who requires access to the team’s files.
  • When making this decision, take into consideration that Google as well as the IU Support Center recommend that, wherever possible, you manage permissions at the drive level. Granting permissions at the drive level is generally less complex and easier to maintain than folder-level permissions.
  • Now, let’s talk about what you’ll need to do with your files post-migration.
  • When your files were migrated to Google Shared Drives from Box, the top-level folder permissions were not migrated along with the folders and files.
  • However, for lower-level folders, the permissions were migrated from Box.
  • Now that we understand the two ways we can grant permission to users in Google Shared Drives, let’s learn how to manage user access.

Managing Shared Drive permissions in Google at IU

  • Let’s look at the environment we’ll be working with in today’s session. I’ll be using a demonstration account – Diane Dell is my alter ego for today’s session. Diane is the owner of a Google Shared Drive, called IU-UITS-Google Permissions. This training Shared Drive is set up to mimic what shared drive managers will see when shared content is migrated from Box. Let’s see how to access the drive, and look at its contents.
  • To start, in the navigation on the left side of the screen, click Shared Drives.
  • A list of the shared drives that Diane has access to will display – to access a shared drive, double-click its name to open it. In my case, I’ll double-click on the IU-UITS-Google Permissions drive.
  • We see the contents of the Google Permissions drive. This drive contains 5 top-level folders, which aren’t currently being shared. However, many of these folders have subfolders where a user was either added to the subfolder (but not the parent folder) in Box, or their access level was increased at a lower folder level (for example, they had View permission for the top-level folder, but Editor permission for a subfolder).
  • As the Shared Drive manager, Diane can make the decision if she wants to use folder-level permissions or drive-level permissions on an individual user basis. If she decides to use folder-level permissions, she’ll need to add the user to the top-level folders so they can access the files they need.
  • However, assigning drive-level permissions is the recommended best practice. To follow this recommendation, Diane will need to add the user to the Shared Drive and take time to check their access to lower-level folders. Let’s see how to do this.

Adding users to the Shared Drive

  • Diane has a number of other users who need access to the Google Permissions shared drive. We’ll start by seeing who currently has accesse.
  • First, expand the list of Shared Drives in the navigation on the left side of the screen by clicking the arrow to the left of the text Shared drives. This will show a list of the drives Diane can access.
  • To view the members of the Google Permissions shared drive, under the search bar near the top of the screen, right-click on the shared drive’s name, and in the menu that appears, click on Manage Members.
  • The Manage members dialog box will appear and display a list of people who are currently a member of this shared drive. At this point, the Shared Drive has two members: Diane and my personal account.
  • In this dialog box, I can grant access to individual users either by their email address (for non-IU collaborators) or their IU Username. I will begin by adding Carol Cape, whose username is demo32.
  • To start adding a user to a shared drive, near the top of the Manage members dialog box, click in the Add people and groups field.
  • When you click in the Add people and groups field, Google will display a list of users you frequently share with underneath the text field. If the user you want to add doesn’t show up in this list, start typing their name or username in the Add people and groups field. I’ll type demo32 here, which is the first part of Carol’s email address.
  • As you type, the drop-down underneath the text field will display users from the IU address book – once you see the name of the user you want to add, click on their name to select them.
  • The Manage members dialog box contents change. From here, I can choose what permissions to grant Carol to the contents of the shared drive, as well as send her a message if desired.
  • We could also add additional users to the list of people we want to add to the shared drive – however, if we add multiple users at the same time, they’ll all have the same access level assigned to them. If we need to assign different levels of access to different users, we’ll want to add them separately.
  • Let’s quickly look at the different access levels we can grant To view the full list of access levels, near the top right corner of the Manage members dialog box, click on the Content Manager drop-down menu.
  • Content Manager is the default access level assigned when adding new users to a Shared Drive. This level of access will let Carol add, edit, move, and delete files. We also see the other access levels we could assign to Carol – Viewer, Commenter, Contributor, and Manager.
  • Let’s quickly talk about the manager permission. In Google, the manager permission is equivalent to a drive owner. Managers can add and delete content as well as change settings and add or remove users from the drive.
  • I’ll assign Carol Contributor access by clicking on Contributor in the access drop-down menu. Carol will be able to create and work with files on the Shared Drive as she needs to, but she will not be able to delete files.
  • The access levels used for your specific Shared Drive will depend on your team’s needs and the work being done. For example, you may decide that group leaders should have Content Manager access and the ability to delete files, while student interns should only have Commenter access.
  • Now that I’ve chosen a access level for Carol, I can notify Carol about this change, and even write her a note to give her information about what’s going on.
  • To choose to not notify a user that they’ve been added to a Shared Drive, above the Message field, uncheck the box next to Notify people. I’ll leave this checked for today, because I want to notify Carol that she’s been added to the Shared Drive.
  • To add a personal message to the notification, in the Message field, type out a message. I’ll type “You now have Contributor access to our shared drive.”
  • To finish adding a user to the shared drive, in the bottom right corner of the Manage Members dialog box, click the Send
  • I’m going to add a second user to the team – Abby Abernathy will be added as a content manager of the Shared Drive. I’ll need to reopen the Manage members dialog box first – again, we can do this by right-clicking on the team’s name near the top of the screen and clicking on Manage Members in the menu that appears.
  • Just like we did previously, I’ll type Abby’s username, demo31, into the Add people and groups field, and click her name when it shows up underneath the text entry field. I’ll leave her access level as Content manager, uncheck the Notify checkbox, and click the Send button to finish adding Abby.
  • To see the new permissions in the Details pane, refresh the page – the users you added should now show up under the Who has access
  • Abby and Carol now have access to the IU-UITS-Google Permissions Shared Drive – they each have different access levels set, but they both can access all the contents of the Shared Drive.

Parent and child folders

  • Now that the team members have been added to the Shared drive, Diane will need to look through the folders and confirm that the lower-level permissions are accurate.
  • Let’s take a moment to examine the permissions related to top-level and lower-level folders. If I click on the folder called Parentfolder and then look at the details panel, I can see that Diane, Carol, and Abby have access to this folder. However, when I open the folder, I can see that it contains a folder called Child This folder has been shared with Doris as well as the members of the Shared Drive.
  • At some point in the past, Doris was added to this lower-level folder. This folder permission remained after the migration. If Doris still needs access to the contents of this drive, we can leave this as it is.
  • However, it’s also possible that Doris has left her position or is no longer working on this project. If that is the case, we can remove her from this lower-level folder.
  • To start the process of removing a user from a folder, right-click on the folder, and in the menu that appears, click on Share.
  • The Share dialog box will open and display a list of all the users who have access to the folder. To see users who have access to the folder who aren’t part of the team, under the Add people and groups field, click the Guests Since Doris Daily isn’t a member of the Shared Drive, she shows up on the Guests tab.
  • To remove Doris’s access to the folder, to the right of Doris’s name, click on the Content manager drop-down, and in the menu that appears, click on Remove.
  • Doris no longer has access to this folder.

Sharing with non-members

  • If you want users from outside IU or your group to be able to access folders in this Shared Drive, we can do this – however, we may need to adjust some drive-level settings first.
  • Before we go into adjusting settings for sharing, it’s important to be aware of some limitations for sharing files and folders, based on a user’s access level.
    • For sharing files, a user needs to have at least Contributor access to the file they want to share.
    • Sharing folders requires the user to have Manager access to the folders they want to share.
  • Now, let’s go ahead with changing the sharing settings for the drive.
  • To see the settings for the drive, at the top of the screen under the search bar, right click on the drive’s name, and in the menu that appears, click on Shared Drive Settings.
  • In this dialog box, the Shared Drive’s manager can choose to allow files to be shared outside of IU or with users who are not members of the Shared Drive. There is also the option to let users download, copy, and print files. Depending on the type of work being done and the type of data being shared, there may be restrictions on what can be shared and with whom.
  • I don’t need to change any of these settings for today – to close the dialog box without making changes, in the lower right corner of the Shared drive settings dialog box, click the Done

Granting folder-level permissions

  • We’ve seen how to add users to a shared drive and adjust drive-level access, as well as how to remove a user from a child folder that may have inherited its permissions from Box. Now, let’s see how to assign folder-level access in Google Shared Drives.
  • Let’s say that Diane has a student intern that needs access to a folder. This intern does not need access to the entire Shared Drive - and in fact, shouldn’t have access to all the content of the Shared Drive. However, they need access to the folder that contains their assigned project. I can add this student to just one folder.
  • We’ll see how to grant a user access to a folder by adding Cathy Catt to a folder inside the Current Projects folder. To start, I’ll double-click on the Current Projects folder.
  • I now see a folder called Intern Projects – this is the folder I want Cathy Catt to be able to access. I’ll right click on the folder, and in the menu that appears, I’ll click on Share. The Share with people and groups dialog box will appear, like we’ve seen before.
  • To add a user to the folder, type in their name or username in the Add people and groups field. For me, I’ll type in demo34, and click on Cathy’s name in the list that appears under the text entry field.
  • I’ll change the access level for Cathy Catt to Contributor, and when I’m done, I’ll click the Send button.
  • Cathy now has access to the Intern Projects folder – and if we go up a level and check the list of people who have access to Current Projects, Cathy doesn’t appear on this list – she only has access to the Intern Projects folder.

Adding a user to a single file

  • What if we have a user that we only want to be able to access a single file? We can do that as well – the process is the same as it is for granting access to a single folder.
  • Diane has another intern, Luke, who isn’t involved in the same project as Cathy – however, Diane wants him to have access to a single file in the Intern Projects folder, the Intern Document Google Doc. Let’s see how to grant access to a single file.
  • First, I’ll navigate to the Intern Projects folder. Once I’m, in the folder, I’ll right click on the file Intern Document, and in the menu that appears, I’ll click Share – the Share with people and groups dialog box appears.
  • Just like we’ve done previously, I’ll type Luke’s username, demo30, in the Add people and groups field, and click his name when it appears in the list. I’ll leave his access level at Editor and click the Send button in the lower right corner of the dialog box to finish adding Luke to the file.
  • When I refresh my browser, I can see that Luke now has access to the Google doc. I’ll move up a level to see the Intern Projects folder – we can see that Luke does not have access to this folder.